Why Tendenci Chose Python over PHP

This blog is a WordPress blog written in PHP. And WordPress, when secured properly, is a great platform.

So why did our team choose to rewrite Tendenci Open Source and in the Python Programming language? It is a question I get asked a lot. We’ve never been a company that likes to talk in the negative if at all possible, yet it is important to talk about the megatrends going on given we work with associations and nonprofits.

which_web_programming_language_is_the_most_secure_

Source: https://www.upguard.com/blog/which-web-programming-language-is-the-most-secure

security-report1

Source: http://info.whitehatsec.com/rs/whitehatsecurity/images/statsreport2014-20140410.pdf

security-report

Source: http://info.whitehatsec.com/rs/whitehatsecurity/images/statsreport2014-20140410.pdf

Popularity of a language is a trend, and what you want is as many developers familiar and liking the language of your open source project as possible. This means you have a better chance to have a secure web site and therefore a more secure future.

To be fair – as Disraeli said – “lies, damn lies and statistics” – so there is no one perfectly secure language any more than there is a perfectly “safe” hammer. There will always be operator error and programmers make mistakes.

So we’re not saying Python is perfect, and all of us have used most of the other languages on those charts at some point. We’re just saying we are pleased so many other programmers also like Python and Open Source. THAT is the best that can be done to secure your future online. Secure code that you can examine yourself and even host yourself!

RIP Ian Murdock – you will be remembered

RIP Ian Murdock, founder of Debian Linux which is what powers Tendenci. Without his work in the Open Source Community there could be no Tendenci Membership Software. This is a sad way to end 2015, but I would like to think Ian would want us to continue to invent and create greater freedom and transparency in the world.

I am not good at wording such a tragedy so I will leave you with the respectful post on the debian project blog and links to some news stories on the topid.

ian-murdock

Proprietary to Open Source: Giving Away Six Million Is Hard

I have the privilege of speaking at SXSW tomorrow morning at 9:30 AM. I first gave the talk on converting our software from proprietary to open source at SXSW V2V in 2014. While much of the message is the same, I’ve been through more, learned more, made even more mistakes and learned from them, and I’d love to help other leaders AVOID my mistakes.

Proprietary to OS: Giving Away Six Million Is Hard

http://schedule.sxsw.com/2015/events/event_IAP42324

GoingOs

The journey for Tendenci going to Open Source seemed like it was going to be simple. Nothing could be further from the truth. It was very hard, and a cost me a lot of relationships, friendships, employees whose potential I felt we hadn’t even begun to push yet. And as I type this Tendenci is emerging from a crisis with EOL (End of Life) for our old proprietary version – the last cord that needed to be cut. We just thought we would dictate the timeline when in fact that hasn’t been the case.

There is a huge gaping hole in the market for The Open Source Solution for Associations, non-profits and NGOs. Because internationally price is a very real issue and if we want to make change, there has to be a free option that is multi-lingual and multi-cultural and affordable. Yes there is still a TCO to FOSS software, but nothing like the costs of proprietary software. And in my opinion Linux is more secure than the competition which isn’t just a benefit, it is a crucial requirement if you are using the software open source in a different country that snoops on your communications.

You must control your data. And over the last several years we have seen our P&L dip negative for the first time and now slowly come back up into the black. And the trend continues as you simply can’t compete with passionate people working on a solution and sharing resources.

But my talk tomorrow is about the transition. What have I learned that I can help others with. That is my goal. To serve the audience. To help you be smarter than me when it comes to navigating through the transition. Because it isn’t “going open source”. It’s taking a “proprietary mindset” and changing it into an “open mindset” and that can, quite frankly, be terrifying to many of us.

And I’ll leave with a photo from Austin from last night as SXSW is many things, and one of them is beautiful. Hopefully my talk will add to everything that is sxsw as that is my goal. It’s corny, but I really do want to make the world a better place.

#peace