More Social Software Visualization

YvonneUnrealArt is artwork based on gameplay in Unreal Tournament. 

All artworks have been created using data from the game "Unreal Tournament".

Each image represents about 30 mins of gameplay in which the computers AI plays against itself, there are 20-25 bots playing each game.

The Bots play custom maps I create. Each map has been pathed so that the bots have a rough idea of where to go in order to create the image I want.

While this is architecturally / location based, graphically it is compelling if manipulated (e.g. "Each map has been pathed so that the bots have a rough idea of where to go in order to create the image I want").  It is art after all.  The related blog is here.

On social software visualization, if activities, or attention, are tracked as locations (again, perhaps manipulated to get the desired result) this method could be used to visualize social software activity.  But not interaction like vizster.

Gillmor’s Attention and “Color Coding of Interesting Actions in Social Software”

On my to-do list is to get Steve Gillmor’s attention and explain that we already have a complete method of numbering and color coding meta data for social software.  And that we want to help and share it if others will.  Call it a social contract, but there IS value in there that can be used for good.

At last year’s eTech 2005 I presented a birds of a feather (BOF) session called "Color Coding of Interesting Actions in Social Software".  I think I had at least four, maybe five people in attendance.  Basically I felt like a geek among geeks which is somewhat frustrating.

Actioncolorcodes By visualization of interesting actions in social software, please note that we are NOT trying to reinvent Vizster, rather we are looking for patterns of actions and attention that relate to society.  Step 1 is TRUST which is what AttentionTrust is working towards.  I like anyone who is willing to write the word ethics or integrity in a sentence.  From there, with some stated ethics we can probably help.  The net result should be something that looks like a GIS graphic but that indicates what people are paying attention to.

It is interesting to note that at eTech I had a brief exchange with some influential folks and I was trying to explain the concept of standardized methods of recording things like article adds, and the response was "but why would anyone share that data?"  And then Steve Gillmor comes along, caustic, rough around the edges to say the least, and he might actually get a level of cooperation on sharing the data.  Maybe this was a message that needed a hammer to initially get attention.

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