IBM *and* Lenova Thinkpad

Laura Ries is going to tear this one up.  It won’t be pretty.

New ThinkPad Is All Work, and Some Play
David Pogue

THE Subaru Corvette … the Green Bay Dolphins … the Microsoft iPod.

There’s no getting around it: sometimes, a company’s name just seems like part of its product name, and anything else just sounds weird. Take, for example, the I.B.M. ThinkPad. Since I.B.M. sold off its entire Think division last May, the laptop line should logically be called the Lenovo ThinkPad.

Yet even Lenovo is torn about that name. Take its new Z-Series laptops: on one hand, a letter to reviewers begs, "Please ensure that you give proper attribution to Lenovo. …Do not refer to products as ‘I.B.M.’ … Use ‘Lenovo ThinkPad.’ " On the other hand, the laptops themselves are stamped with large, colorful I.B.M. logos, molded into the plastic of both the lid and the keyboard deck – and the word Lenovo doesn’t appear anywhere.

Can you say "identity crisis"?

PR Disaster: Candidates that lie

This one is amazing, after everyone repeating over and over "no fake blogs" we still get fake blogs.  And for bonus points, innacurate fake blogs for a politician.  Great.

On the Candidates’ Blogs, Writing Right and Wrong
By PATRICK D. HEALY
Published: September 28, 2005

Mr. Ferrer, the Democratic candidate for mayor, nevertheless found himself stumbling yesterday after his political opponents pointed out something amiss on his campaign Web site: a personal log entry "posted by Fernando Ferrer," in which he recalled attending "public schools for most of my education."  Mr. Ferrer actually attended Catholic schools for most of his education
….
They maintained that Mr. Ferrer did not write the blog entry attributed to him.

"An item submitted by Freddy Ferrer was inaccurately edited regarding Freddy’s education," Nick Baldick, the campaign manager, said in a statement. "We apologize for the mistake and have corrected the entry."

Yet even that explanation was not quite right. Jen Bluestein, a spokeswoman for the Ferrer campaign, said the candidate did not submit a written item but rather "passed on some ideas" to an aide, who then wrote three paragraphs and posted them in his name.

"This happens in political campaigns all the time," she said. "In this case he called in some ideas, and someone got a little loose with the editing."

Oh, well if everyone does it then I guess it is OK.  Uuuuugh.

cognitive analysis of tagging

Tagging is easier than categorization because you don’t have to make as many decisions.

A cognitive analysis of tagging   (http://www.rashmisinha.com/)
(or how the lower cognitive cost of tagging makes it popular)
….
With tagging … you can note as many of those associations as you want. This is how tagging works, cognitively speaking. Yes, it’s that simple.

What I suspect the author is saying is that we don’t like to make decisions.  I don’t.  I get home from work and sometimes I can’t figure out what t-shirt to change into.  As I post this on typepad there is a keywords box shown below that does cause me a bit of stress at the end of a post.  Basically keywords are tags, or relevant topics at a minimum.  I suppose keywords have a sort-of-unwritten rule that they are supposed to be nouns while tags can be nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc.

Other challenges of tags, or really any ontology:

1) You can’t guarantee other humans will categorize like you do, so even if you can remember your own categories your methods may be in no way helpful to others.  For your mp3 collection this is fine, but for social software you are breaking the social contract and not providing value to others.  We will find a way to derive value, but you get my point.

2) Time changes how you categorize stuff.  As a young man you might put owning a yacht into the "success" category while a former boat owner would categorize this as "classified listing".

2) A sense of fairness can screw up categories.  This is just a brain game we all play.  If I categorize 50 items and they get divided as 25, 10, 10, 4 and 1 – I will really look at the category with one (1) item to see if I can’t refile it in one of the larger categories.  It is the odd-man-out so surely it must fit in another category or nobody will ever find it in the future, right?  I can’t explain this reflex.

4) Cultural relevance, although I believe tagging and categories both suffer from this limitation.  Rashmi, the author of the above article, discusses cultural relevance in her article but this probably warrants a complete novel unto itself.  We need a cultural-tag-encyclopedia in the future.  "Cadiallac means AAAAAAA in Detroit and Cadillac means BBBBBBB in Tokyo… or similar.

I will defer to Rashmi’s analysis on the cognitive aspects of tagging.  Definitely worth further thought.

Pay Per Call Model – maybe for small businesses in some situations

I was linked an article on pay per call pricing model for web sites.  This means the web site works to generate leads and only charges if it results in a phone call to the client company. 

At a technical level this means that the pay-per-call provider does not want the prospect to call the company directly, but rather through a tracking telephone number so they can fairly measure the number of calls generated.  This will work.  It will result in calls.  But it seems a short sighted overall strategy because;

1) It omits the value of branding. The company is paying for the leads alone, nothing more.
2) Contacts will continue to call the tracking number in the future reporting false positive matches on inbound calls. 
3) You are going to market as someone else’s brand, so not only are you not getting the branding value but you are also paying to build someone else brand!
4) If you end your contract that pay-per-call company can, and will, redirect the campaign to a competitor.  Given the importance of tenure on the Internet this could be a real problem effectively locking you into the pp-call program.

All of that said, yes there are times when this model will work for some businesses.  But it is definitely not as Earth shattering as Pay-per-click advertising has been with the low cost of entry, performance based pricing and free branding side affects.

MSN profile data mixed with adwords

From AdAge, this is the next logical step in pay per click.  Although it is hard to tell from the article if this actually is PPC or if it is more targeted marketing based on demographics.  So here is the quote and commentary below.

MSN LINKS KEYWORD SEARCH TO DEMOGRAPHIC DATABASE
New Feature Enables Marketers to Target Search Engine Ads at Specific Groups
September 26, 2005
By Kris Oser

NEW YORK (AdAge.com) — In a effort to technologically outflank Yahoo and Google, Microsoft Corp. will launch a new U.S. keyword paid-search program that enables marketers to target their keyword buys at specific consumer segments.  The new feature links keyword search techniques to MSN.com’s demographic database of 400 million registered users.

AdCenter allows advertisers to draw from MSN’s 400 million users worldwide who have registered for MSN’s Passport, Hotmail or Messenger services.

AdCenter allows advertisers to draw from MSN’s 400 million users worldwide who have registered for MSN’s Passport, Hotmail or Messenger services. Based on the demographic information those users provided, the advertiser can then target commercial messages based on geographic location, gender, age range, time of day and day of week. MSN can then also overlay additional data rented from database marketing companies, such as wealth index and psychographic information, to target more specifically.

(full article)

I added the emphasis and underlining.  Here is the deal, the web responds like direct marketing in PPC and SEO *because* the user *at that moment* typed in a specific term.  They have told you two things; first what they are interested in (dishes, BMW, etc) and second WHEN they are interested in it (RIGHT NOW!). 

The challenge with classic direct marketing is that repetition is key because there is only so much you can do to predict the timing but you can characterize that this group is likely to buy this object or service.  With direct mail you just keep hitting them with letters or cards or whatever trying to reach them WHEN they become interested buyers.  Let them buy when they are predisposed buyers.  The genius of search marketing is both questions are answered.  You know what the buyer is interested in and when they are interested.  So the program above from MSM is cool but classic DM.  It won’t be the surprise hit that search engine marketing has been with targeted buyers and a pay as you go pricing model that small business can afford.  It will be added value in the marketing mix.

B2B Marketing Trends running my article on SEO and qualified marketing leads

*self plug warning* – B2B Marketing Trends is running an article from our team:

How Much Is a Qualified, Interested Lead Worth to You?
Ed Schipul

Many organizations grow frustrated that their Web site never seems to be included among the top listings on Google or Yahoo. To help organizations move up the search engine listings, an entire industry has emerged, full of specialists who stay on top of changes made to the arcane inner workings of search engine algorithms. However, this takes time, and they may be tempted to use some of the trickery that is tainting the search engine marketing field.

    One alternative that can immediately show results is search engine advertising. (more)

Definition of Television

Shelly Palmer posed an interesting question to his NYC Emmy New Media list.  Define Television. 

Television: A tube that shows stuff. 

Damn, he probably wants something deeper than that.  On Shelly’s blog he gets all deep on this new media stuff so my bet is he really wants an answer to the question of "what is television?"  I found that I could not define television in just one way because what it is is NOT what it soon will be.  I had to first say what it is, and then what it will be.  Standing on the mountain preaching down to the viewers, telling them when to arrive and what they will see and that they will like it; those days are gone.  Even interactive television is still one main editor and content provider, or at least an elite group, talking to the masses.  It is not a conversation, and that is the fundamental problem.  So this is my response to the question:

What is television?

Right now we understand Television to be: An advertising supported mass entertainment medium that sends video, pictures and audio to a remote viewing box.   It is a one way medium providing edited content utilizing limited resources for transmission (radio waves or cable) which makes scarcity a problem.  The competition economics of the medium lead it to sensational but highly professional content to attract advertisers.  Advertisers and content owners attempt to maintain ownership and control of their content.
 
What Television will be:
 
A user driven method of displaying videos, recorded from the past, happening real time, or scheduled to be recorded in the future and displayed on demand for an end user based on their time table.   Television becomes one of many possible portals to view video.  Video remains primarily an entertainment medium but with unlimited resources for transmission (the Internet in addition to radio waves or cable) the democracy of content creation reduces the demand for high dollar advertisers.   Television production as we know it becomes more pay per click and branding focused.   TV and video become part of the conversation that is the blogosphere.   It evolves into a conversation and the one way communication “down“ from broadcast stations to the public falls away into antiquity.

NYT on improving students through school integration by income in North Carolina

The New York Times has a story that makes you go "duh" but nonetheless is something that should be part of the dialog on education in America. 

As Test Scores Jump, Raleigh Credits Integration by Income (reg required of course)

RALEIGH, N.C. – Over the last decade, black and Hispanic students here in Wake County have made such dramatic strides in standardized reading and math tests that it has caught the attention of education experts around the country.

The main reason for the students’ dramatic improvement, say officials and parents in the county, which includes Raleigh and its sprawling suburbs, is that the district has made a concerted effort to integrate the schools economically. (more) By ALAN FINDER

Racial segregation in America required integration to recover, but mostly because at the time race had a high correlation with economic capability.  The very success of desegregation has created diverse economic groups within racial groups so it only makes sense that integration based on economics will produce the same positive results that desegregation did.  They are the same thing, with an acknowledgement that times have changed.

Tivo DRM flag issue precurser to independents exceeding major label music

I am a geek at times.  OK, quite a few times. I read enough PR and spend enough time on PR strategy that I can almost sound like a PR guy, but it is the interaction of technology and PR for social ends that most interests me.

I won’t buy a piece of hardware that restricts my access to files. I change iTunes to record mp3 instead of ACC right after I install it.  Instictively.  Why?  I really don’t know, I hardely ever transfer files and record from CDs that I buy at the store onto mp3s.  Perhaps it is because I go through computers a lot and don’t want to have to rerecord everything if I upgrade.  I still buy CDs over paying for songs on iTunes for some reason – not sure why.

What I do know is that the feeling in my gut of "this is icky so others probably feel the same way" is usually dead on.  So I now won’t buy a tivo because it won’t record in the true sense of the word.  Tivo is limited in that I must choose to record something before I can time-shift view it.  With podcasting I can go backwards or forwards in time without restrictions.  And now Tivo thinks a downgrade is in order? They want to limit it more?  Sure that is their legal right, I am just saying as a marketing guy that it ain’t going to fly.  Duh.

End game; major labels are becoming secondary to independents.  Not because of independent lables, but because of myspace.com which has hit songs like Emo Elmo by Andrew Mcshan.  Emo Elmo is genius and I don’t have to worry if it will sync with my iPod.

Major bands are going to have to come up with pseudonyms so they can post great music to indie sites free while major labels kill themselves with denial.  Then they will still have some popularity to drive attendance at their concerts which is where they make money anyway.  Walmart cut out wholesalers because they could do the job for 3% less.  Think about it.  If you do not add value to a transaction, be afraid.

Inhouse SEO versus outsourced – but data can be deceiving

From toprank quoting Marketing Sherpa SEO report

For SEO, overall site traffic lift six months after optimization was:
Agency optimized 110% increase
In-house optimized 38% increase

OK, so for those of us who sell SEO as a service this is great news.  But let me flip that statistic for you.  It means that the content matter experts, the client themselves, is incapable of correctly articulating their point from a search engine perspective.  This indicates a huge failure on the part of both the authors (what IS your point?) and the search engines (trying to read the minds of the authors).  This is NOT good news for distributed authoring and putting SEO in the hands of the everyday user.

Our position remains that distributed authoring is vital to society.  It is vital to creating the mass that becomes the wisdom of crowds.  That voice can’t be heard if tools like search engines and SEO that is content focused doesn’t come naturally to the authors even if helped with tools (think wall studfinders when hanging a painting, that is what a keyword density calculator should be like to authors.)

Bloggers pay rates probably seem reasonable to companies

There is a lot of commentary on blogger pay rates (Can Bloggers Strike It Rich?) these days.  Working in marketing and being familiar with clients’ advertising budgets, they strike me as a bargain.  To have a strong online advocate posting and defending your product, perhaps working in conjunction with a creative online PR strategy, for $500 to $2500 a month is a bargain. 

Of course any online effort first needs to be ethical. So I do deeply hate fake blogs.  Where I see this going is bloggers are "sponsored" by news organizations as well as other companies.  Like NASCAR drivers have Quaker State on their car, a blogger should have an affiliated logo for CNN *and* MSNBC as sponsors. The consumer is smart enough to realize that a sponsorship does not mean the sponsored individual is the brand, or even fully represent the brand at all times.  The obstacle here is the media which currently asks their own reporters to not write for other organizations except for freelance writers.  So sponsored bloggers, with multiple sponsorships, is somewhere between the current world of reporters and freelancers.

Having contributed to numerous magazines for freelance articles over the last several years, the biggest problem for me is the time delay. It is hard to get excited about an SEO piece for public relations professionals that will run four to six months down the road when I am afraid the content won’t be fully relevant.  Publishing in the MSM compared to blogging and writing seo articles on our site in real time; there is just no comparison on which one is more gratifying.

Wiki’s beyond authoring

Rob Hoff wrote an interesting piece on wiki’s called Learning to Work with Wikis about the Business Week news team using a social text wiki to collaboratively compile their Best of the Web list.  They did a number of things right:

1) They waited until he had an actual need, to compile a collaborative list and keep work efficient, and then sought out an appropriate social software tool; a wiki in this case.
2) He limited the authoring on the wiki to a group of interested people, or knowledge-matter-experts.
3) They sound like they approached it with a sense of playfulness.  Social software does not work in my opinion without a sense of "what if" and "wouldn’t it be cool if" is behind it, at least initially.

Some observations on what he could have done to improve the use of the wiki.

1) Rob noted that he probably limited the authoring a bit too much.  Not enough authors, or editors, and you lose the creativity of a free flowing group.  Too many and you wind up with a spawiki (spam wiki).
2) Did not use, or at least did not mention work flow.  My personal belief is that wiki implementations need better work flow management.  He may have used work flow, but I’d sure love to hear about the work-flow even it the implementation of the work flow was social (verbal, email, offline, whatever).
3) He chose as a wiki test a topic that lends itself to opinion.  Not everyone is created equal despite the wisdom of crowds and when compiling a "best of" list you obviously have opinions which prevent the use of NPOV (Neutral Point of View).  So from a proof of concept point of view this was a tough selection.  Sort of like you really should fly an RC airplane before trying an RC helicopter (different story…)

Overall I’d like to see more journalists working with wiki’s internally or in a controlled but enthusiastic fashion to help move the media past the LA times wiki fiasco

Preference engines – will ROCK if they better integrate social software

In between hurricane Rita head counts, Slashdot has a post on an LA times story about preference engines.  From the article:

Their spread worries some who fear that preference engines can extract a social price. As consumers are exposed only to the types of things they’re interested in, there’s a danger that their tastes can narrow and that society may balkanize into groups with obscure interests.

"As these things get better and better, nobody has to encounter ideas they don’t already agree with," said Barry Schwartz, professor of sociology at Swarthmore College and author of "The Paradox of Choice: Why More Is Less." "We lose that sense of community we had when there were shared cultural experiences, even though we may not have liked them. Now we can create our own cocoon and keep all that unpleasant stuff out."

The doom and gloom predictions are not warranted, because almost all preference engines have a social element to them.  Google considers links, created by humans, so even their infamous algorithms are a combination of social and machine factors.  Preference engines do add value.

I on the other hand would prefer if Rita would go away.  I am betting 100% agreement in the echo chamber of Houston opinion today.

In between Rita

Rita.  Everything in Houston is about Hurricane Rita. Shut down the office temporarily of course.  Thank heaven for data centers and redundant connections! The latest map suggests a hit on Galveston, and being on the North side of Houston we will likely get winds up to 100 miles an hour.

On the plus side, it was nice to set up a wiki page to handle employee communications and updates.  Besides email, the wiki may be our best connection given cell phone coverage was spotty yesterday, two days before the storm, from over use.

The traffic map in Houston shows mostly 5 or 6 miles an hour, or no data available.  Meaning people in cars are parked on the freeway making new friends.  Gas stations are out of gas on the evacuation routes.  Us silly humans haven’t exactly built the infrastructure to actually execute our emergency plans.

Rita is one hell of a brand

Today was/is/will be all about Hurricane Rita.  On a marketing and PR note, this "brand" was invented last week when the tropical storm was named.  Now we all refer to it like Nike.  So much for my belief in the Ries philosophy of "it takes 10 years to form a brand".  There is no doubt that Katrina is a brand, not a good one, but a brand nonetheless.

On a software note, we recently added first responder capabilities, volunteer coordination to supplement stuff already in place like newsletters (prioritized for first responders of course).  That is all great technology that actually helps people in a time of need.  Based on the number of newsletters relating to Katrina and Rita that I have seen go by in the last few weeks, the sum of the parts is very cool.

Tagging, SEO and Articles

On Information Retrieval and Tagging – Sometimes the counter point is great.  Such is the case with Gene Smith’s post on Why Tagging Is Expensive which asks the question of if the sum of the cost of tagging and wading through bad tags is greater than the benefit.  Actually Gene’s piece is a follow up on another article by Ian

If you have ever used a document management system that required meta data entry on save, then you feel my pain.  Being prompted for required meta data is ridiculous and I will freely admit that if I have a simple idea before lunch just knowing the stupid-human-tricks I will have to perform to create the document will prevent me from creating it.  Additionally adding keywords such as tags requires something of a knowledge matter expert to properly categorize things.  No, I am not siding with the librarians and their outdated hierarchies, but neither can I accurately categorize a picture of a whale (are they warm blooded?  hmmmm…..) as well as a George on Seinfeld.

Ease of use changes behavior.  So forcing tagging on all content authors is not the answer. And from a guy obsessed with distributed authoring, anything you do that slows down the creation of distributed content reduces the intelligence of the group.  The crowd is less wise – which is bad.

As for our Tendenci software, we are trying to divide the tagging into a prompt after content add.  So the user should see a keyword cloud, but then select from that on what they feel is the most relevant as the tags.  And be able to add other tags free form.  Having worked with SEO for years I can honestly say that people are *usually* surprised at the density of terms in their text until they are trained to think about it.  This is not surprising – you must learn to be a communicator and good communication skills do not come easily.  Why should you not also need tools to help you with accurate tagging?  The problem might be the tags, but then again it might be, it probably IS, a problem with the content!