deep thoughts by a whale

Vegas with Night Lights
Alien Landing in Vegas

The Book:

It is important to note that suddenly, and against all probability, a Sperm Whale had been called into existence, several miles above the surface of an alien planet and since this is not a naturally tenable position for a whale, this innocent creature had very little time to come to terms with its identity.

This is what it thought, as it fell:

The Whale:

Ahhh! Woooh! What’s happening? Who am I? Why am I here? What’s my purpose in life? What do I mean by who am I?

Okay okay, calm down calm down get a grip now. Ooh, this is an interesting sensation. What is it? Its a sort of tingling in my… well I suppose I better start finding names for things. Let’s call it a… tail! Yeah! Tail! And hey, what’s this roaring sound, whooshing past what I’m suddenly gonna call my head? Wind! Is that a good name? It’ll do.

Yeah, this is really exciting. I’m dizzy with anticipation! Or is it the wind? There’s an awful lot of that now isn’t it? And what’s this thing coming toward me very fast? So big and flat and round, it needs a big wide sounding name like ‘Ow’, ‘Ownge’, ‘Round’, ‘Ground’! That’s it! Ground! Ha!

I wonder if it’ll be friends with me? Hello Ground!

[dies]

Falling Behind?

Hey I'm Jamie

From: Falling behind? by Jamie Varon

But, honestly, here’s the thing that nobody really talks about when it comes to success and motivation and willpower and

goals and productivity and all those little buzzwords that have come into popularity: you are as you are until you’re not.

You change when you want to change. You put your ideas into action in the timing that is best. That’s just how it happens.

falling behind
Jamie Varon on falling behind in life

And what I think we all need more than anything is this: permission to be wherever the fuck we are when we’re there.

You’re not a robot. You can’t just conjure up motivation when you don’t have it.

and

There’s a magic beyond us that works in ways we can’t understand. We can’t game it. We can’t 10-point list it. We can’t control it. We have to just let it be, to take a fucking step back for a moment, stop beating ourselves up into oblivion, and to let the cogs turn as they will. One day, this moment will make sense. Trust that.

Give yourself permission to trust that.

Full post on Medium by Jamie Varon is here:

Jamie Varon is a writer based out of Los Angeles. You can connect with her on Twitter, Instagram, and at her Facebook page. Because we all need candid smart and fearless thinkers in our lives. This one impresses me.

On being crazy and Elon Musk almost having a nervous breakdown

You feel like a failure. You know, a failure like Elon Musk. To quote the irresponsible risk taking and brilliant Mr Musk:

“The end of 2008 was really really terrible. I never thought of myself as somebody who could have a nervous breakdown…. I came pretty close honestly in 2008 the day before Christmas…. We just barely made it.”

Q: “So you did have those experiences?”
A: “We had multiple near death experiences. Like death on the nose. Not just in front of you.'”

Q “What’s it like when you go all in and you are about to lose?”
A: “It’s quite a terrible emotion actually.”

http://www.businessinsider.com/elon-musk-on-failure-tesla-bankruptcy-2014-11

So maybe Elon is crazy. He risked his own failure and thousands of people’s jobs. But he isn’t a failure. He rebounded pretty well it turns out. Because he was willing to face death and total failure and keep fighting. To use his words “death on the tip of your nose” and then salvation one hour before Tesla would have gone bankrupt.

One hour. One single hour away from complete devastation.

#dude

(addendum)

“Be strong and courageous.
Do not be afraid; do not be discouraged”
– Joshua 1:9

we sort of talked about why the strings are there, and they’re there to help us

For his entire life, Golson’s had the raw ability to simply throw the ball, never using the laces of the football to guide his mechanics. Left alone by the Irish staff, Whitfield has gotten Golson to change a life-long habit by helping the young quarterback understand why using the laces is important.

“I said, ‘Listen, I understand, it’s remarkable what you do without them, and you’re going to need that, because sometimes you’re going to need that when you’re under the gun.’” Whitfield explained. “Then, we sort of talked about why the strings are there, and they’re there to help us, and they are there to kind of easy things out, and they allow us to do X, Y and Z with the football.”

– Keith Arnold

something must be done

I agree that something must be done. It’s time for a meaningful, nation-wide conversation about mental health. That’s the only way our nation can ever truly heal.
God help me. God help Michael. God help us all. – Liza Long

(source)

no time for a salesman, i have a war to fight


“I have no time for a salesman right now. I have a war to fight!”

This was on the desk of an associate of mine, or one that looked very similar about 20 years ago. Still true today. We all resist change, even if that change is a Gatlin Gun that sure would come in handy in the immediate future.

chaos is inherent in all compounded things. strive on with diligence.

“Chaos is inherent in all compounded things” is most likely a mistranslation of what Buddha said.

Buddha did say that “suffering (dukkha) is inherent in all compounded things.”

and

The Buddha encouraged us to strive with diligence because when we experience the truth of our lives – that everything is impermanent, lacks an essential nature, and is marked with dissatisfaction – then we gain the great freedom of enlightenment.

(source)

knowledge is best developed by doing, not just thinking or planning

Keeping your career in permanent beta forces you to acknowledge that you have bugs, that there’s new development to do on yourself, that you will need to adapt and evolve. It is a lifelong commitment to continuous personal and professional growth.

Entrepreneurs penetrate the fog of the unknown by testing their products, and their hypotheses, through trial and error. Any entrepreneur (and any expert on cognition/learning) will tell you that practical knowledge is best developed by doing, not just thinking or planning.

(source)

put your paws up (POTUS)

“I respect the beliefs of others, and the right of religious institutions to act in accordance with their own doctrines. But I believe that in the eyes of the law, all Americans should be treated equally. And where states enact same-sex marriage, no federal act should invalidate them.”

– POTUS, 2012

“Put your paws up….”

Commentary: Yes I realize my job is a “role”, that of CEO. Yet sometimes I reserve the right to point out what I believe to be obvious. Sometimes that obviousness is bigotry in the form of discrimination against people for the way they were born, created, by God.

Example:

In 1981 when I met a good friend it was clear to me he was “born that way”. The first week of high-school we all didn’t know how to react to him. What was his deal? Huh? Turns out he is a great man. Different from many of us. Being born gay, something we all knew but he didn’t confirm until many years later. If asked he denied it. We didn’t care because he was a good friend and a good man. Period. He was part of our tribe and good heavens we all had our own weirdness.

Years later I remember the call when I was in college when he said “I have something to say” and I said “we know, we knew in high school, and it doesn’t change a bloody thing. We love you as you are dude.” His response was “you knew?” and, for lack of a more refined response I said something like “we all knew, we didn’t care, and I’m pretty sure you knew even back then but that doesn’t matter. You rock and it’s so great to hear from you.”

I’d have my PR team refine my response now. But it wouldn’t change the message.

I stand by my statements. I’d do the exact same thing today. I do. Accept.

Different? Yes, a minority. But God’s creation. This wasn’t some “choice.” This was simply who the man was. He was born that way. And who am I to judge how God creates us? Do I really understand it? No. Do I understand at a logical level why I find women attractive? No. We are truly just “born that/this/the-other way.”

So regardless of your politics, I love hearing the President of the United States state clearly his support of gay rights. States rights first, yes, but given a states’ choice the Federal Government should stay out of it. And I rarely agree with politicians, but in this case, I  agree. Tip of the hat to your courage POTUS. Keep on keepin on.

 

the book is not supposed to solve

Scores of readers, often students, wrote to Wilder over the years seeking his position on the questions posed in The Bridge. In this excerpt from a letter written march 6, 1928, four months after the appearance of the novel, Wilder responds to a query from John Townley, one of his former pupils at Lawrenceville.

The first:

Thornton Wilder
Davis House
Lawrenceville, New Jersey

Dear John:

The book is not supposed to solve. A vague comfort is supposed to hover above the unanswered questions, but it is not a theorem with its Q.E.D. The book is supposed to be as puzzling and distressing as the news that five of your friends died in an automobile accident. I dare not claim that all sudden deaths are, in the last counting, triumphant. As you say, a little over half the situations seem to prove something and the rest escape, or even contradict.

Chekhov said: “The business of literature is not to answer questions, but to state them fairly.”

I claim that human affection contains a strange unanalyzable consolation and that is all. People who are full of faith claim that the book is a vindication of this optimism; disillusioned people claim that it is a barely concealed “anatomy of despair. I am nearer the second group than the first; though some days I discover myself shouting confidentially in the first group.

Where will i be thirty years from now? – with Hardy or Cardinal Newman?

– Thornton Wilder

Afterward, The Bridge of San Louis Rey

I always say

I always say I work only with people I love and I can make only things I love.

– Alber Albaz

dramatically speaking, intention is everything

“When the pressure is intense, a driver who is being chased relentlessly by a competitor, realizes that he might be better off pushing from behind than pulling from the front. In that case the smart move is to yield his lead to the trailing car and let the other driver pass. Relieved of his burden our new leader can tuck in behind and make the leader drive his mirrors.

Sometimes however it is important to hold one’s position, and not allow the pass. For strategic reasons. Psychological reasons.

Sometimes a driver simply has to prove that he is better than his competition. Racing is about discipline and intelligence. Not about who has the heavier foot. The one who drives smart will always win in the end.

Sometimes you have to assert yourself.

And dramatically speaking, intention is everything.

No race has ever been won in the first corner. But many a race has been lost there.”

– Enzo, The Art of Racing in the Rain

…nothing so liberalizes a man

“…nothing so liberalizes a man and expands the kindly instincts that nature put in him as travel and contact with many kinds of people. An Englishman, an Irishman, a Scotchman, an Italian or so, several Frenchmen and a number of Americans were present, and you couldn’t ask a question about any possible country under the sun, but some fellow in the crowd had been there and could give the information from personal experience.”

– Mark Twain