Juneteenth – We Must Remember History to Not Repeat It.

We must remember our fellow American’s EARNED it. And by “it” I am not speaking of their “freedom”. The Constitution makes clear that Freedom is “God Given” and “Inalienable.”

Juneteenth was not the day that ended slavery. It was the day they learned that a wrong had been righted, and the truth had been withheld. Another lie to slowed the healing of America.

“My people have a country of their own to go to if they choose… Africa… but, this America belongs to them just as much as it does to any of the white race… in some ways even more so, because they gave the sweat of their brow and their blood in slavery so that many parts of America could become prosperous and recognized in the world. ”

Josephiner Baker

– Josephiner Baker, legendary entertainer and activist

Quote Source: https://www.becauseofthemwecan.com/blogs/culture/juneteenth-10-powerful-quotes-to-remember-on-freedom-day

I believe in the power of freedom, in the power of truth, and in standing in solidarity with black Americans who to this day do not enjoy freedoms and laws that protect all of us. But are still enforced and applied unjustly and unevenly.

The next equivalent of Juneteenth in America, I predict, will be the day when White people get the news. When white people understand the news. News of what is already written, news of what is already the law of the land. We just have to acknowledge our equality and acknowledge we are far stronger as one nation.

Image source: https://commons.m.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:JosephineBaker1964NL.jpg#mw-jump-to-license

Image description from wikimedia:

English: Josephine Baker and her 10 adopted children in a tour boat (President John F. Kennedy) in Amsterdam (the Netherlands), 4 October 1964Date4 October 1964SourceGaHetNa (Nationaal Archief NL)916-9642AuthorHugo van Gelderen (ANEFO)

Black Lives Matter – A Message from our CEO (Crosspost from Tendenci)

As a company we have a very clear vision.

To Connect and Organize the World’s People. Do Good.

With the turmoil tearing through our country as the realization of systemic racism and the physical danger black people are facing, as the CEO of Tendenci, I want to add to the dialogue. While these opinions are being typed by me, I do hope every member of the Tendenci team shares these values.

I believe in this:

Black Lives Matter

I’m a graduate of Texas A&M University, I have *not* served in the Military but I am an Army brat. Many in my family have served and I grew up on Army bases. So as we say at TAMU “Let me tell you a Story Ags!”

The Survey Questions from “Brats: Our Journey Home”.

Years ago I filled out a survey for a movie that was in Production/Screenwriting stages called “Brats: Our Journey Home“. The survey had tons of questions about my experience growing up as an Army Brat. One question was on racism in the Army.

I responded, in all seriousness, to the question that If I thought Racism was no longer a big problem in America. Literally, I said “no, I don’t think  it is.”

Truly I can’t make this up.

The next day, my phone rings. It’s either the producer or the director on the line. I’m like “what? huh?” Obviously I wasn’t expecting that. We exchange small talk and then he asks me “So Ed, you really don’t think Racism is that big of a deal in America?” 

I repeated my answer, perhaps a bit more timid, but still I replied with “no, not really. I just don’t see it.”  (stay with me and keep reading please….)

The producer asked me, and I am paraphrasing as it has been a while, the following:

Director: “Ed, can you name one place in the United States of America in 1958 where a black man could tell a white man what to do and they had to do it unconditionally?”
Me: “um… an Army base?” (Ding ding ding… the lights start to go on….)

Director: “Yes. That’s it Ed! One place! You grew up on bases all over the United States and overseas and YOU never saw how large a problem it was and still is. Because you are white, even though racism was still there on base to a lesser degree, it wasn’t visible to you. YOU grew up a white kid in a non-political environment and thought nothing of having a black family join y’all for dinner. That’s how you were raised.”

The director continued…

“Have you ever heard the saying that ‘you don’t care about the color of a man’s skin if he’s sitting in a foxhole with you?’ You have because your Father served in Vietnam.”
Me: “OK.. you make a damn good point. I learned to ride horses from Master Sergeant Willians (Ret), and played basketball, and worked out with the GIs at the gym, and I guess I just never really thought about it.”

I’ll stop there. I was wrong back then. And I promise you, if you think racism is not a big issue in America to this day, you are wrong. There ARE things we can do to change it. And we must. 

I have contributed, but more importantly, I need to recommit to ACTS of change. Not words or hashtags. 

I believe this image from twitter user x says it far better than I can, so I will let these words speak for themselves:

https://www.instagram.com/p/CA8FEIuF3a5/

From twitter user https://www.instagram.com/p/CA8FEIuF3a5/

#peace

Ed Schipul
CEO/Founder
Tendenci – The Open Source AMS

Originally posted at https://www.tendenci.com/news/black-lives-matter-a-message-from-our-ceo/ on June 4, 2020