Microsoft Worm Exploit Danger and Huawei Unintended Consequences

From the article titled: Warnings of world-wide worm attacks are the real deal, new exploit shows

It was posted Tuesday by Sean Dillon, a senior security researcher and RiskSense. A play-by-play helps to underscore the significance of the feat.

https://twitter.com/zerosum0x0 and reinforced by the NSA:

Source: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2019/06/new-bluekeep-exploit-shows-the-wormable-danger-is-very-very-real/

“It’s these last six seconds (of the video) that underscore the danger posed by the vulnerability, which according to Internet scan results posted eight days ago remains unpatched on almost 1 million computers. The flaw, which is indexed as CVE-2019-0708 but is better known by the name BlueKeep, resides in earlier versions of the Remote Desktop Services, which help provide a graphical interface for connecting to Windows computers over the Internet. A much more detailed blow-by-blow is here.”

(It) Only takes one unpatched system to spread

Last Friday, members of the Microsoft Security Response Team practically begged organizations that hadn’t patched vulnerable machines to do so without delay, lest another WannaCry scenario play out. “It only takes one vulnerable computer connected to the internet to provide a potential gateway into these corporate networks, where advanced malware could spread… officials with the National Security Agency on Tuesday echoed Microsoft’s warning. The video posted by Dillon, particularly in the last six seconds, demonstrates that the danger is in no way exaggerated.

If the intermingling of Mimikatz and a critical Windows vulnerability to devastating effect sounds familiar, it’s probably because that’s how another paralyzing worm, dubbed NotPetya, managed to wipe out entire networks. According to an analysis from Kaspersky, NotPetya, which is regarded as the most expensive malware attack in history, used the Eternal Blue exploit developed by and later stolen from the NSA to exploit one or more vulnerable machines. NotPetya,

and

In the NotPetya analysis, Kaspersky researchers wrote, “IMPORTANT: A single infected system on the network possessing administrative credentials is capable of spreading this infection to all the other computers through WMI or PSEXEC.”

Source: https://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2019/06/new-bluekeep-exploit-shows-the-wormable-danger-is-very-very-real/

My Thoughts on EternalBlue, BlueKeep and Why These Are Human Problems

Closing thoughts: NOT all countries can realistically afford the cost of the Windows Operating System in their schools. But without that experience they can’t compete, so they use hacked versions. If you lived in Indonesia or Mongolia, what would you do?

Those companies, with employees using hacked system in countries of different economic status, are possible subcontractors for international global leaders (like Maersk for example). They are the weak leak, because a hacked Windows system can’t be patched.

To be clear: I do *NOT* agree with software theft. But I also don’t agree with sloppy work on the part of our security agencies that have the resources to secure the nuclear weapons of the cyberwar that are being unleashed against not just the US, but the world.

We all need to stop and think about the overall situation. I believe the existential threat of EternalBlue, a gift that keeps on giving, is that it was an American agency funded by the US tax payers that did not report the vulnerabilities to an American software company. For years.

Unintended Consequences of Huawei and Google Android Patch Ban (possible)

Bonus Round: What if nobody can patch their Android phones, or at least half of them? That would be awesome. Or not. And that looks like a definite possibility in the near future if Google cuts Huawei off from Android patches per US restrictions.