via the economist’s article on pornography and patriotism

China and Japan both lay claim to the Senkaku/Diaoyu islands. These little guys:


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Nobody lives there. But with land comes international rights to nearby water. The Guardian explains it thusly:

What is the row about?
The eight uninhabited islands and rocks in question lie in the East China Sea. They have a total area of about 7 sq km and lie northeast of Taiwan, east of the Chinese mainland and southwest of Japan’s southern-most prefecture, Okinawa.

They matter because they are close to strategically important shipping lanes, offer rich fishing grounds and are thought to contain oil deposits. The islands are controlled by Japan.

Before we laugh it off, remember that Iwo Jima is also an uninhabited Rock that our country fought mightily to conquer for strategic reasons.

What I wasn’t expecting was to read about a Japanese actress / adult-film star stepping into the fray as a voice of peace. Apparently Sora Aoi is very popular in China. From the article in the Atlantic:

A Japanese actress reminds her Chinese fans how conflicted they are

OF ALL the positions with which Sora Aoi has excited her Chinese fans (and there have been many), this was among the more surprising. As anti-Japanese sentiment flared across China, the former porn star issued an online appeal, in fetching calligraphy, for Sino-Japanese friendship. One placard waved at anti-Japanese protests over the disputed Senkaku/Diaoyu islands read simply: “the Diaoyu islands belong to China; Sora Aoi belongs to the world.”

And somehow a recent microfilm she released that is about 5 minutes long it tied into the whole thing. The tone of the video is very much in line with the American movie China Town (G rated) and very soulful.

I don’t understand the film, although artistically it is beautiful. A quick image search on the actresses name suggests not all of her films are of the same caliber. It is just interesting that a former porn actress is the messenger of peace and reinvention. To help two countries avoid going to war over a rock.