Race, Blogging and Issues Facing the Black Community Research Links

Natalie J of KCOH has me scheduled for an interview tomorrow. It should air tomorrow night. Interviews stress me out. Public speaking? No problem. Interviews you really are completely in the hands of the interviewer and as somewhat of a detailed person I like to be prepared. I have opinions and have no problem sharing them, but opinions with facts behind them are always better.

So, to get ready for the interview on the oldest black radio station in Texas(I am a white) I have been researching work I studied while a Political Science student at Texas A&M years ago. Think 1980s. It’s been almost 20 years. So I have no clue.

I do recall perhaps the most controversial book in one of our classes read was The Myth of Racist Criminal Justice System. Numerous tenured professors argued the exact opposite. This led me to look for some recent statistics on race and crime in the USA.

This is not a research paper. Perhaps mostly these are links for my own reference. So here goes.

Population of USA 2005 – 296,410,404 (from census.gov)
White persons, percent, 2005 (a) – 80.2%
Black persons, percent, 2005 (a) – 12.8%

and from the bureau of justice, it is still far riskier to be black than white:

Racial differences exist, with blacks disproportionately represented among homicide victims and offenders

with the data (copied from 2004) being:

  • Race patterns among offenders are similar to those among victims.

 

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

         

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

 

 

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

   

Homicide Type by Race, 1976-2004
    Victims   Offenders
White Black Other   White Black Other
All homicides 51.0% 46.9% 2.1%   45.9% 52.1% 2.0%
Victim/offender relationship              
Intimate 56.5% 41.3% 2.2%   54.3% 43.6% 2.2%
Family 60.6% 37.1% 2.4%   59.1% 38.6% 2.3%
Infanticide 55.8% 41.6% 2.5%   55.3% 42.2% 2.5%
Eldercide 69.1% 29.3% 1.6%   54.4% 44.0% 1.6%
Circumstances              
Felony murder 54.8% 42.7% 2.5%   39.1% 59.3% 1.6%
Sex related 67.0% 30.6% 2.4%   54.9% 43.3% 1.9%
Drug related 37.2% 61.9% .9%   33.8% 65.1% 1.1%
Gang related 57.6% 39.0% 3.5%   54.4% 41.3% 4.3%
Argument 48.5% 49.4% 2.1%   46.7% 51.1% 2.1%
Workplace 84.9% 12.0% 3.1%   70.5% 26.4% 3.1%
Weapon              
Gun homicide 47.3% 50.8% 1.9%   42.0% 56.2% 1.7%
Arson 59.2% 37.9% 2.9%   55.7% 42.0% 2.3%
Poison 80.2% 17.2% 2.5%   79.6% 18.6% 1.8%
Multiple victims
            or offenders
             
Multiple victims 63.6% 33.1% 3.4%   56.1% 40.5% 3.4%
Multiple offenders 55.0% 42.3% 2.7%   44.8% 52.8% 2.4%

As if crime defines race. It (obviously) doesn’t. Yet it hijacks the conversation in circles of influence so it is relevant.

And some great thinkers like Gladwell are working to define racism. Gladwell’s criteria to define racism is based on Content, Intention and Conviction. Dialog ensues.

I know at our company we observed multiple genders and races testing positive (this was 2004) for forms of implicit racism just as Gladwell himself scored (from his book Blink). This is not right, or wrong, it just IS.

Searching the blogosphere leads to sites like The Angry Black Woman and Blackfolks. TABW has an interesting post on black leadership:

The more I look around today, the more I feel that the men (and it
is always men) being presented to us as black leaders or that the media
claims are black leaders do not really qualify as such. Jesse Jackson
is a fine man, but who really ‘follows’ him? If he told you to boycott
something, would you? Al Sharpton is becoming less of a joke, but I
still don’t take him completely seriously. Obama is ‘clean’ and
‘articulate’, sure, and I wouldn’t call him an Uncle Tom or anything,
but he is not a black leader. In fact, he’s more of a leader leader,
which is probably good for someone who wants to be president. I have
nothing against that.

So here’s my question: What would a real black leader of the 21st century be like? (comments here

Talking to numerous people about these topics led one person to point out to me an interesting comment. They commented that in their opinion "black communities tend to rally around ministers" at least historically.

I don’t have an answer. This is just me trying to get up to date on issues facing the black community. Or better yet, on opportunities facing the community. I am working with others on a solution as far as we can in Houston. The 5th Ward in particular. (disclaimer: 5th is a Tendenci client)

Next some PEW Internet research data on race and blogging. From the PIP Bloggers Report July 19 2006 by Lenhart / Fox:

Another distinguishing characteristic is that bloggers are less likely to be white than the general internet population. Sixty percent of bloggers are white, 11% are African American, 19% are English-speaking Hispanics and 10% identify as some other race. By contrast, 74% of Internet users are white, 9% are African American, 11% are English-speaking Hispanic and 6% identify as some other race.

If blacks make up 9% of the Internet population and 11% of the blogging population (in America) that means they are MORE likely to have a voice.

More links and research as time allows. None of this will probably come up in the Interview but at this point I am curious.