Stutz: Useful software written above the level of the single device

Trying to wrap my brain around business models and APIs of the big guys. Generally our strategy is to ignore them and focus on our customers needs. Innovate from there. But I came across this quote worth pondering:

"Useful software written above the level of the single device will command high margins for a long time to come." – David Stutz

and this one as well, both written in a context of Microsoft

"Digging in against open source commoditization won’t work – it would be
like digging in against the Internet, which Microsoft tried for a while
before getting wise. Any move towards cutting off alternatives by limiting
interoperability or integration options would be fraught with danger,
since it would enrage customers, accelerate the divergence of the open
source platform, and have other undesirable results." – David Stutz

From 2003 no less. And now Microsoft is committed to live technologies. Or what O’Reilly calls Web 2.0.

 

Things the user can actually do versus things the product can do

I bought a cell phone recently that I loathe. It is a complete brick that somehow tips past convergence of convenience to the land of this-damn-thing-sucks. And I am a moderately tech savvy, right? But if your phone weights so much you have to worry about your belt falling then you are less likely to wear it. A different post on that….

Capabilitiesvennonebad_1
Checking in with the headrush blog creating passionate users led me to the graphic on the right (from their blog). Interestingly the post starts off about SLR cameras and I HAVE been able to get past the P mode on my camera into some fun stuff. By reading magazines, books, surfing flickr and thinking "how did they do that??" I still need to take a class.

My fear on this topic? My fear is that our Tendenci clients are not getting the value they could from our product because of usability and training. We have a ton of help files etc, but are they getting to the right people at the right time? Hmmmm.