Hype Versus Talent Versus Word of Mouth Versus Hype Versus the Arctic Monkeys

This article "The Truth Behind Arctic Monkeys Buzz — They Are SO January" (Dan is a client) on the hype of the Arctic Monkeys made me want to "see" what was going on.  Dan also linked me a few other blog posts on the band-hype subject.

So here are a few graphics on the Arctic Monkeys. The first is an overlay of influential blog mentions with all blog mentions behind it.  Basically the same chart run on technorati with transparency on the all category.

Arcticmonkeysinfluentialvsallblogs_1

and this is similar data from blogpulse, except in this case I added SXSW because the Arctic Monkeys performed. And I added punk rock for perspective.

Arcticpunkrocksxswblogpulse

Going back to Dan’s article on the subject, his point is that the blog universe has already moved on. Drawing a conclusion from this is not certain, but here is the logic:

If you get all your information from the mainstream media, you might think the Arctic Monkeys will be the next big thing. But there is evidence that even though there is plenty of excitement among journalists, the thrill appears to be gone among insiders.

It’s a story that should interest public relations practitioners looking to help their companies and their clients strike PR gold. It’s also a story that might prompt some in the public relations community to rethink where the mass media fits into the buzz-building equation.

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Dan goes on to discuss Mavens and Connectors in the Gladwell Tipping Point context.  The question I have is perhaps they, the arctic monkeys, still are the next big thing and bloggers are more early adopters who have moved on while the main stream continues to chew the pop gum spreading it to the masses. 

Every time I do public speaking I ask how many people in the room are bloggers. Granted this isn’t a democratic survey, but still, I get less than 5% if it is any place besides a geek conference.

I really don’t know the answer, but it is fun to look at the data. And before blogpulse and technorati looking at the data was very hard.