Google and Accoona for “Perception of Public Relations” – Accoona no match!

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I received an email that made me curious about the difference between Accoona (which I had not
heard of) and Google (ya, someone told me about google once) on understanding the context of a search. From the Accoona site:

Accoona Artificial Intelligence is a Search Technology that understands
the meaning of search queries beyond the conventional method of
matching keywords.

and

Accoona’s Artificial Intelligence uses the meaning of words to get you better searches.

The email was from a PR agency so of course I searched on "perception of public relations" in both search engines.

Everyone loves an underdog, particularly an underdog victory. But alas, such is not the case with Accoona. Google pretty much trounced them in my very unscientific comparison. This is one search, one test, yada yada and I look forward to checking back with Accoona.

One thing Accoona can do immediately to improve results is kill all of the advertising at the top. Obviously the ad engine is not as advanced as the search engine part. As a user advertising at the top IS search results. Right hand ads are extra stuff to me. But note that even without the top 3 ad served results, google still produced more of what I was specifically looking for.

Perhaps pay some turkers to evaluate a larger quantity of results, hopefully in a double blind test? But I don’t think PR alone, perception or not, is going to raise Accoona above Google in my perception any time soon.

Quote of the Day – Brought to you by Youth and MySpace

"I challenge all Latino and Hispanic-descent people to come out with us tomorrow, to miss one day of work, because that will show the city of Houston, and everyone in the nation, how badly this (proposed immigration restriction) will affect the country,"

Jesse Quintero, a senior at Eisenhower High School from the Chronicle articleThe vehicle to organize? Myspace. Cool use of social software technology. The article continues.

Quintero posted a note on MySpace.com, an Internet site where some high
school students socialize, to recruit participants. His message quickly
spread to other area schools: about 200 students at Cypress Ridge High
School in Cypress-Fairbanks Independent School District walked out
after first period, but were coaxed back into an auditorium by the
principal and headed back to class by third period, said Cy-Fair
spokeswoman Kelli Durham.

Whatever your position on immigration, I am personally glad to have innovative kids like Qintero as citizens. Innovation is key and technology applied to social issues is powerful. Danah would be proud.